Challenges In The Design Process

I did encounter issues at the start of the design process, initially trying to draw the spirals by hand. The big issue was that I was not achieving clean lines when hand drawing the spirals, so I decided to recreate these spirals on the computer. This was the best thing I could do, using software like illustrator to create these spirals, with the help of guides as well as careful use of maths. From then on, I work on the computer to produce my maths orientated patterns. I often had to work with a calculator to work out angles, when dividing 360 degrees by a number of the Fibonacci Sequence. As I did not have Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop or InDesign at home, I had to work with free open source software, including Gimp, as a Photoshop substitute and Scribus, as a InDesign Substitute. I also work with Libra Office Draw, to produce and edit the shapes for my patterns. The quality of my designs were not as good in my open source software, as they were when using the Adobe Suit. I often spent time improving the quality of any design made at home on my open source software, using the tools in the Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop in college.

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My Attempt on Hand Drawing a Golden Spiral

 

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My failed attempt at hand Colouring my Print
Blood Red
Successful neat finish of computer made spiral

Other challenges I came across was trying to fit the music piece within the time frame, I wanted to complete my book by. As it was only meant to be an extra to go along with my final piece, I had to in the end make the crucial decision whether I really needed the music piece or not. In pure honesty, I did not really need the music composition, but it would have made a good extra to go along with the final piece, to create an atmosphere, when people view my book. In the end, I decided to scrap the music composition, as I simply did not have the time. Underneath is the incomplete track, which I would have built upon if I had more time. I tried using the musical notes as well as the change of the octaves in correspondence to the Fibonacci Sequence.

https://www.audiotool.com/track/fibonacci-BOao1/

https://www.goldennumber.net/music/

The main challenge I faced was how I was going to make the book. In my original proposal, I was going to make the book myself, using a durable material for the cover, like leather and beautiful textured paper for the leaves. I was going to learn about book binding and experiment with binding techniques like saddle stitch. Furthermore, I wanted to look in art shops to find materials I can use for the book cover as well as look for good quality textured paper to print my designs on. My plans changed when I was beginning to run out of time, as it took longer than expected to complete all the necessary research and complete all my designs. I had to start considering to get the book printed professionally by a publisher, as I would struggle to make my book to the professional standard I aimed for, with not enough time to learn how to make the book professionally. Ideas also came into my head, thinking that perhaps I could sell the book, so I started to look for companies that will print a small batch of 10 of my books, finding Inky Little Fingers doing the best deal. However, when having discussions with my peers, they made me realise the fact that people do not pay for swatch books, that they are usually given free. Time was still ticking, worried that I was going to run out of time to get the piece complete by the deadline, concerned if there would be any complications with the book at the printer, that I would not get my book back in time. I had to think of alternative ways of printing the book, so I looked around for more local places to print my book, including the Print Lab in college, Staples, Colourbridge in Ivybridge and The Art Side in Mayflower Street, Plymouth. I ask about the prices and the types of binding they do and out of that, I found that The Art Side had the best deal, plus they could make the book within half an hour.

Staples Print Lab – PCA
  • 117 sheets on silk paper – £74.88 (64p each).
  • Wire Binding – £4.39.
  • PVC Cover 75p x2.
  • Card Cover 75p x2.

Total: £82.27

Waiting Time – Hour.

Verdict – Too Expensive.

  • Comb Binding – £1.
  • Print Book on college laser printers – 5p per sheet (117 pages – £5.85).
  • Card and acetate covers to be bought outside the college.

Total: £6.85 + cost of card and acetate.

Waiting Time – 20 minutes.

Verdict: Inexpensive, but lacks professional quality.

Colourbridge South West Printers – Ivybridge The Art Side – Mayflower Street, Plymouth
  • Comb Binding £3.50.
  • 55p A4 colour single sided (117 pages – £64.35.
  • Card and acetate included in bind price.

Total: £67.85

Waiting Time: Hour

Verdict: It is cheaper than staples, but still a bit pricey for one book. Plus comb binding is not a good quality binding.

  • Comb can easily undo and pages fall out.
  • The comb can also easily break.
  • A4 colour single sided print on 130gsm silk paper – 30p each.
  • Wire Binding for up to 125 pages – £2.90 – includes card for back and acetate for front.
  • Acetate for back – 30p.
  • Card for front cover – 30p.

Total: £38.60 – was charged £38.55???

Waiting Time: 30 minutes.

Verdict: Professional quality finish at a reasonable price.

Perfect Bound – Inky Little Fingers

Perfect Bound

Wire Bound – Inky Little Fingers

Wire Bound

 

I had to make a decision whether it was best to bind it using perfect bound or wire bound. when I thought about how the people would use the book, perfect bound would not be suitable, as after a period of time the pages will fall out, if the book was continuously opened fully to test the patterns against the wall. So wire bound was the best option, as the pages can be flipped all the way to the back.

Another Challenge was working out the best way to present the each design on each page. In InDesign, I experimented creating 4 potential design layouts to present my designs. I showed these designs to my tutor and to peers, discussing with them which one they felt presents the work the best and looks the most professional. Having the pattern centred in the middle of the page, in a neat square looked the best. However they told me that I should limit the information to just the title of the design underneath the image, which I altered in my layout.

Design Templates

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Design 1 – Full page, with info on white.
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Design 2 – Pattern square in centre of page.
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Design 3 – Full bleed of image, with white type in black boxes.
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Design 4 – Pattern closer to the top of the page, with title of work directly underneath the design.
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Altered layout of Design 2 – Scanned image from proof copy – winning design with pattern in the centre of the page, with only the title of the work underneath the pattern.

 

One book was printed in the end, for people to flick through to find their favourite designs. The thought came to me after I printed the book, that I should print posters of the best designs, but as I could not make up my mind on which one to print, I made a questionnaire of the top 9 posters for people to vote on, picking the six best designs. Ten questionnaires were printed and handed over for students and tutors to fill in. I tallied the results and found that, Fire Flare, Nautilus Red Flare, Ferns, Indian Flowers White, Leaves and Plump Cream, were the people favourite six. I printed them at The Art Side, A2 size to be hung in the exhibition. After they were printed, the idea came to me to make an Origami pot of the design, linking in my Design To Sell project. I used “Ferns”, the most liked design out of all my series for the main sections of the of the pot. Simple green infills were used for the surrounding sections, to avoid taking the attention away from the main pattern. On the outer edge and the centre, there were not any suitable patterns to fill the sections, so I had to make customary patterns to fit in with the designs in the middle. When I eventually made the pot layout, it was printed out first on A4 on my printer at home, to see if the design works out, which It did. The design was then printed at The Art Side A0 size, which was trimmed and I folded it into an origami vase, which measures an impressive 28cm wide X 28cm long X 28 cm deep. I realised I would also benefit from some business cards, however for a 100 full colour double-sided business cards in The Art Side, will cost me £ 20. This was a bit much considering how mush I spent already, so I printed them myself at home on card, printing 45 full colour double sided business cards in total, as I don’t need many.

Questionnaire Example:

Questionnaire – Poster Selection

Posters Tally

Order of Preference (Top to Bottom)

Fire Flare

6

Indian Flowers White

1

Nautilus Illustration Series

8

Ferns

2

Psychedelic Pink

5

Leaves

2

Ferns

8

Nautilus Illustration Series

2

Peacock Feather Diamonds Cream

2

Plump Cream

3

Indian Flowers White

10

Fire Flare

4

Leaves

8

Simple Red

5

Plump Cream

7

Psychedelic Pink

5

Simple Red

5

Peacock Feather Diamonds Cream

6

Posters Decided For Printing

Lastly, my patterns and swatch book were going to be displayed in a booth, decorated with my designs of wallpaper and furnished. However, considering the size of the room and the amount of students work to be shown, it was impractical. I printed posters instead which I hung in my space in the exhibition, with my book, my origami pot and some of my posters laid out on a table.

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